Recent Changes

Thursday, May 10

  1. page home edited THALLIUM Overview Thallium Common Materials and Chemicals Wiki for Chemistry 103: This is a…

    THALLIUM
    Overview
    Thallium
    Common Materials and Chemicals Wiki for Chemistry 103:
    This
    is a member ofwhole class wiki for Chemistry 103 at Colorado State University for the aluminum family, Group 13 (IIIA) onSpring 2012 semester. Contributions to the periodic table. The periodic table is a chart that shows how chemical elementswiki are relatedworth up to one another. Thallium is also a member75 out of the heavy metals, along with gold, platinum, and lead.
    Thallium was first discovered by means of a spectroscope. A spectroscope is a device
    650 for analyzing the light produced when an element is heated.semester. The spectrum (plural: spectra) of an element consists ofwiki was started as a seriessimple list of colored linessubstances that are different for every element. The brightest lines in the spectrum of thallium are green, which accountsstudents generated. A page was created for its name. In Greek, the word thallos means "green twig." The green lines in thallium's spectrum look like green twigs.
    Thallium is not only a highly effective depilatory, it is also an extraordinarily nasty poison. While its use as a hair remover
    each substance and as a rat and bug poison is now severely restricted, there have still been some high-profile instances of its recent use against people.then more detailed information, links to other web sites, structures, etc. were added. In one instance, it was little children who died.
    Back in 2007 a student at the China University
    addition, various summary pages with links to connected substances were added.
    Index
    of MiningMaterials and Technology, in Xuzhou City, Jiangsu province, poisoned three of his classmates by lacing their drinks with thallium nitrate. They all survived.
    Sadly, there was no such happy ending for
    Chemicals:
    Chronological listing (as added throughout
    the 10 memberssemester)
    Alphabetical listing (by systematic and/or common name)
    By course topic: chemistry bootcamp, molecules
    of two families who were poisoned by thallium-laced cake in Baghdad, Iraq, on Jan. 22, 2008. In this incident, two children (ages 2 and 11) and two adults died. The surviving six adults were severely poisoned.
    SYMBOL
    Tl
    ATOMIC NUMBER
    81
    ATOMIC MASS
    204.37
    FAMILY
    Group 13 (IIIA)
    Aluminum
    PRONUNCIATION
    THA-lee-um
    Read more: http://www.chemistryexplained.com/elements/P-T/Thallium.html#b#ixzz1uUhbOY8d
    life, air, water, energy

    (view changes)
    2:51 pm
  2. page Actinides edited ... {s9s.JPG} More on Actinides and Nuclear Chemistry ... uranium and plutonium. Plutonium.…
    ...
    {s9s.JPG}
    More on Actinides and Nuclear Chemistry
    ...
    uranium and plutonium.Plutonium. Uranium, a
    The isotope of chief interest is plutonium-239, which, like uranium-235, is fissionable. Most nuclear weapons are based on plutonium-239, while plutonium-238 is used as a power source in long-mission space probes
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e0/Nagasakibomb.jpg/220px-Nagasakibomb.jpg}
    (view changes)
    12:55 pm
  3. page Activation Energy edited activation energy is a term introduced in 1889 by the Swedish scientist Svante Arrhenius that is de…
    activation energy is a term introduced in 1889 by the Swedish scientist Svante Arrhenius that is defined as the energy that must be overcome in order for a chemical reaction to occur. Activation energy may also be defined as the minimum energy required to start a chemical reaction. The activation energy of a reaction is usually denoted by Ea, and given in units of kilojoules per mole.
    ...
    compounds react togethernaturallytogether naturally just by
    ...
    after a certainamountcertain amount of energy
    ...
    on the sideofside of a matchbox,
    ...
    activation energy (inthe(in the form of
    ...
    necessary for thechemicalsthe chemicals in the
    ...
    energy is usuallyexpressedusually expressed in terms
    Activation energy can be thought of as the height of the potential barrier (called the energy barrier) separating two minima of potential energy (of the reactants and products of a reaction). For a chemical reaction to proceed at a reasonable rate, there should exist an appreciable number of molecules with energy equal to or greater than the activation energy.
    ...
    Arrhenius Activation is energy term
    {exo.gif} The above diagram displays the activation energy required to complete an exothermic reaction.
    Negative Activation Energy
    (view changes)
    12:55 pm
  4. page Cinnamaldehyde edited ... The most obvious application for cinnamaldehyde is as flavoring in items like chewing gum, ice…
    ...
    The most obvious application for cinnamaldehyde is as flavoring in items like chewing gum, ice cream, candy, and beverages.
    Cinnamaldehyde is also used as a fungicide.[5] Proven effective on over 40 different crops, cinnamaldehyde is typically applied to the root systems of plants. Its low toxicity and well-known properties make it ideal for agriculture. Cinnamaldehyde is an effective insecticide, and its scent is also known to repel animals
    ...
    1834 and was synthesized in
    Molecular Formula: C9H8O
    Monoisotopic mass: 132.05751 Da
    (view changes)
    12:54 pm
  5. page Antimony edited Basic Facts ... soft metal, therefore so it Properties: Element Classification: Semimetall…

    Basic Facts
    ...
    soft metal, therefore so it
    Properties:
    Element Classification: Semimetallic
    (view changes)
    12:54 pm
  6. page Carbonic acid edited Carbonic acidis acid is an inorganic Carbonic acid appears frequently in the natural world. It …
    Carbonic acidisacid is an inorganic
    Carbonic acid appears frequently in the natural world. It can be found in sodas, champagne, and blood. The acid even appears in rain. {Carbonic-acid-3D-balls.png}
    During the making of soda, carbon dioxide is dissolved in water which creates carbonic acid. This acid, along with phosphoric acidand other acids, provides the tart taste in many sodas. It also provides a slight burning sensation that a person feels when ingesting a fizzy drink.
    (view changes)
    12:53 pm
  7. page Baking Powder edited ... Using this in baking helps alot in higher altitudes and makes the baked good more fluffy. His…
    ...
    Using this in baking helps alot in higher altitudes and makes the baked good more fluffy.
    History
    ...
    meaning that the retention of
    Following the American Civil War Joseph and Cornelius Hoagland developed a baking powder with the help of an employee, and their formula became known as Royal Baking Powder. The small company eventually moved to New York in the 1890s and became the largest manufacturer of baking powder Eben Norton Horsford student of Justus Von Liebig, who began his studies on baking powder in 1856, eventually developed a variety he named in honor of Count Rumford. By the mid-1860s "Horsford's Yeast Powder" was on the market as an already-mixed leavening agent, distinct from separate packages of calcium acid phosphate and sodium bicarbonate. This was packaged in bottles, but Horsford was interested in using metal cans for packing; this meant the mixture had to be more moisture resistant. This was accomplished by the addition of corn starch, and in 1869 Rumford began the manufacture of what can truly be considered baking powder. During World War II, Byron H. Smith, an inventor in Bangor, Maine, created a substitute product for American housewives, who were unable to obtain cream of tartar or baking powder due to war food shortages. Under the name "Bakewell", Smith marketed a mixture of sodium pyrophosphate mixed with corn starch to replace the acid cream of tartar component of baking powder. When mixed with baking soda, the product behaved like a single-acting baking powder, the only difference being that the acid is sodium pyrophosphate. He named the product "Bakewell" and the product is still part of regional culinary history. In 2006 the development of Rumford Baking Powder was designated an ACS National Historical Chemical Landmark in recognition of its significance for making baking easier, quicker, and more reliable."
    Use
    ...
    Yield: One tablespoon of baking powder.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nek_YVvvFoo

    (view changes)
    12:53 pm
  8. page Denitrification edited Denitrification is a microbially facilitated process of nitrate reduction that may ultimately produ…
    Denitrification is a microbially facilitated process of nitrate reduction that may ultimately produce molecular nitrogen (N2) through a series of intermediate gaseous nitrogen oxide products.
    ...
    returning N2 (dioxide) to the
    The process is performed primarily by heterotrophic bacteria (such as Paracoccus denitrificans and various pseudomonads),[1] although autotrophic denitrifiers have also been identified (e.g., Thiobacillusdenitrificans).[2] Denitrifiers are represented in all main phylogenetic groups.[3] Generally several species of bacteria are involved in the complete reduction of nitrate to molecular nitrogen, and more than one enzymatic pathway have been identified in the reduction process.
    Direct reduction from nitrate to ammonium, a process known as dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium or DNRA,[5] is also possible for organisms that have the nrf-gene.[6] This is less common than denitrification in most ecosystems as a means of nitrate reduction. Other genes known in microorganisms which denitrify include nir (nitrite reductase) and nos (nitrous oxide reductase) among others;[7] organisms identified as having these genes includeAlcaligenes faecalis, Alcaligenes xylosoxidans, many in the Pseudomonas genus, Bradyrhizobium japonicum, and Blastobacter denitrificans.
    (view changes)
    12:52 pm
  9. page Boric acid edited ... Boric acid is also used as a treatment for vaginal yeast infections known as candidiasis. Also…
    ...
    Boric acid is also used as a treatment for vaginal yeast infections known as candidiasis. Also, Boric acid can be used in the treatment of other infections like the athlete's foot fungus.
    Uses
    ...
    acid has a variety ofmany different uses. It
    As mentioned above, boric acid is used in fiber glass manufacturing and as an insecticide. Boric acid aids the fiberization process of fiberglass, which can then later be used in fiberglass insulation and textile fiberglass. In insecticides and bug control products, it acts as a desiccant which dehydrates the insects. It causes tiny fissures, or cracks in the exoskeleton which will eventually dry them out. The saltiness of boric acid also interferes with the metabolism of the bugs which is very simple and electrolytic. Boric acid is also used in products to control fungus. This is because boron compounds inhibit the growth of fungus, and have also shown to be a reliable wood preservative. You can also find boric acid as a substitute for chlorine in some swimming pools and spas. It's used as a substitute because it is safer, prevents contamination, and gives the water a softer feeling. Some miscellaneous uses for boric acid are in metallurgy (where it is used to harden and treat steel alloys), aiding in the application of metal plating materials, ceramics, enamel coatings, adhesives, lubricants and many others.
    {http://imgusr.tradekey.com/p-5110558-20110616121226/boric-acid.jpg} {boric%20acid.png}
    (view changes)
    12:49 pm
  10. page Asbestos edited ... Fiberglass and silica fibers can be used in substitution of Asbestos products. These fibers ha…
    ...
    Fiberglass and silica fibers can be used in substitution of Asbestos products. These fibers have proven to be equally heat resistant and durable as fibers from Asbestos. Products include, ropes, sleeves, insulation, tapes and fabrics.
    Asbestos is a mineral fiber that has been used commonly in a variety of building construction materials for insulation and as a fire-retardant. Because of its fiber strength and heat resistant properties, asbestos has been used for a wide range of manufactured goods, mostly in building materials (roofing shingles, ceiling and floor tiles, paper products, and asbestos cement products), friction products (automobile clutch, brake, and transmission parts), heat-resistant fabrics, packaging, gaskets, and coatings.
    ...
    health problems. Schools and public places check abestos because it can cause sickness.
    History:
    The use of asbestos has been dated back as far as 4500 years ago in what is known as Finland today. The mineral, anthophyllite, was used in pots and utensils as a strengthening agent. The word asbestos comes from the ancient Greek meaning "inextinguishable." Asbestos became widely used during the Industrial Revolution of the 1800's. It became widely used as a fire retardant and even in cigarette filters.
    (view changes)
    12:49 pm

More